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Calculators


Let us help you find out what you can afford! Our mortgage calculator will help you determine loan amounts, mortgage qualification, or whether you should be renting or buying.


Complete the fields below (e.g., Cost of Home, Down Payment, Monthly Income) and click Calculate Now. To view the different results of your calculation, click on the various tabs. To mail yourself a copy of your results, click the Receive this Detailed Analysis link.

Required Fields
Term In Years:     
Interest Rate:      %
Cost of Home:  $
Down Payment:  $  
Annual Insurance:  $  
Estimate Insurance to 0.43% of Cost
Annual Property Tax:  $  
Estimate Tax to 1.2% of Cost
Monthly Income:  $
Monthly Debt:  $
Optional Fields
Gross Debt Service Ratio (GDS):     
Total Debt Service Ratio (TDS):     
Condos Fees:  $
Results
  Receive this Detailed Analysis

Your Monthly Payments
 
Loan Amount:
Loan Insurance (%):
Total Loan (Mortgage) Amount:
 
Principal & Interest:
Homeowners Insurance:
Property Taxes:
Condo Fees:
Monthly Loan Insurance (%):
Total Monthly Payment:
Income Needed to Qualify for the Mortgage
Total Monthly Loan Payment:
Total Monthly Debt Payment:
Monthly Loan Insurance (%):
Qualifying Income of % GDS Ratio:
Qualifying Income of % TDS Ratio:
What You Can Afford
We are using the % ratio.
Cost of House:
Down Payment:
Loan Value:
Monthly Principal & Interest:
Monthly Insurance:
Monthly Property Tax:
Monthly Condo Fees:
 
Cost of House = [(Monthly income x Debt Ratio) – monthly tax – monthly insurance – condo fee] /
(monthly interest rate/ function of interest rate)
Renting
Monthly Rent: $
Annual Rental Increases:  %
Monthly Renter Insurance: $
Savings or Investment Rate:  %
 
Owning
Planned # of years in home: 
Yearly appreciation of the home:  %
Annual home maintenance:  %

 

President Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal established the Federal National Mortgage Association (Fannie Mae) in 1938 as a federal agency in the wake of the Great Depression. Its purpose was to bring liquidity, stability and affordability to the U.S. housing and mortgage markets. Congress converted Fannie in 1968 to a publicly held corporation to help balance the federal budget.

To compete against Fannie Mae's domination of the secondary market and further lower housing costs, Congress chartered the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (Freddie Mac) as a public corporation in 1970.

Freddie and Fannie have similar Congressional mandates, charters and regulatory structures. Both entities buy mortgages from lenders and package them into mortgage-backed securities that are sold to investors with a guarantee against default. This creates a secondary market, allowing mortgage lenders to use the freed-up funds to make more home loans.

The Government National Mortgage Association (Ginnie Mae) was established by Congress in 1968. Unlike its GSE siblings, Ginnie does not purchase loans, but guarantees investors the timely payment of principal and interest on mortgage-backed securities containing federally insured loans — mainly FHA and VA loans.

In September 2008, the U.S. government rescued Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac from the brink of economic failure and placed them into conservatorship with the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA). Some members of Congress have called for the gradual elimination of Fannie and Freddie to leave mortgage finance completely in the private sector. A Treasury Department report on the future of Fannie and Freddie will be delivered to Congress in the first half of February 2011.

Loan Programs

Financing Your First Home 
 

Determine what you can afford

Each buyer is unique - and we'll help you find out just what you can afford. Your income and your debts will typically play the biggest roles in determining your price range. It's simple to make an estimate, just run the numbers for yourself using our Affordability Calculator.

Figure out your funding

A range of mortgage options are available, and we'll help you determine which can work for you - some loans require little money down. You'll also need to consider closing costs and the escrow account for taxes and insurance. But don't get overwhelmed: it's a snap to figure out how much money you'll need using the Affordability Calculator.

Less-than-perfect credit report?

Don't worry, there are options that are ideal for those who have a few "dings" on their credit report. Work with your lender to develop an individual mortgage program based on your unique credit worthiness.

Loan Programs

Finding the best loan program for your needs depends on a number of factors, including:

How long you'll stay in the home;

How much money you'll put down;

How you'll finance the closing costs.

For information on the loan programs and rates available just visit Loan Programs.

Tax Benefits

You may be able to deduct the interest you pay on the mortgage loan and some of the financing costs of the home, such as points. And your property taxes could be deductible. You should consult your tax advisor for more information.

Fixed-Rate Mortgages

A fixed-rate mortgage means the interest rate and principal payments remain the same for the entire life of the loan. (Taxes, of course, may change.)

Advantages include consistent principal and interest payments make this loan stable your rate won't change, so you don't need to worry about market fluctuations. A good choice if you're likely to stay in this house for a long time.

Disadvantages include a possibly higher cost - these loans are usually priced higher than an adjustable-rate mortgage. Keep in mind that, on average, most people move or refinance within seven years. If rates in the current market are high, you're likely to get a better price with an adjustable-rate loan.

30 Year Fixed-Rate Mortgages offer consistent monthly payments for the entire 30 years you have the mortgage. So if the market is good, you can benefit from locking in a lower rate for the full term of the loan. The best choice if you're looking for a long-term, stable loan - for instance, if you're planning on staying in your house for some time.

20 Year Fixed-Rate Mortgages allow you to make a consistent monthly payment throughout the 20 years you have the mortgage. The shorter term means you pay the loan off more quickly, and therefore pay less interest. And you'll build equity faster than you would with a 30 year loan. (But remember the shorter term means higher payments, when compared to the 30 year fixed-rate mortgage.)

15 Year Fixed-Rate Mortgages mean consistent monthly payments for all 15 years you have the mortgage. By building equity even more quickly than with a 30 year or 20 year loan, and paying less interest, you'll save money in the long run. It's an ideal option if you can handle the higher payments and if you'd like to have the loan paid off in a shorter period of time - for instance, if you plan to retire.

Adjustable-Rate Mortgages

An adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM) means that the interest rate changes over the life of the loan - according to the terms specified in advance. With ARMs:

The initial interest rate is usually lower than with a fixed-rate mortgage.

The monthly repayment would also be lower.

The interest rate may be adjusted (up or down) at predetermined times.

The monthly payment will then increase or decrease.

Most ARM programs do offer "rate cap" protection, which limits the amount the rate can be increased, both each year and over the life of the loan. All ARMs are amortized over 30 years.

Advantages include lower costs - ARMs are usually priced lower than fixed-rate mortgages so you can increase your buying power and lower your initial monthly payments. If interest rates go down, you'll enjoy lower payments. Usually an ARM is the best choice for homeowners who plan to relocate (for example, with their company or the military), or for those who are purchasing their first home and plan to be in the property only for three to five years. Remember that, on average, most people move or refinance within seven years.

Disadvantages include the possibility of increasing monthly payments if interest rates go up. Keep in mind that ARMs are best for homeowners who aren't planning on staying with a property for a long period. If you're on a fixed income, an ARM (especially a short-term ARM) may not be your best choice.

Adjustable-Rate Mortgages provide a fixed initial rate of the loan for the first ten years of repayment. After 10 years, the rate adjusts every year thereafter for the remaining life of the loan. The loan is amortized over 30 years, so you'll enjoy the stability of a 30 year mortgage at a lower price than a fixed-rate mortgage of the same term. But an ARM is likely not the best choice if you're planning on owning the same property for more than 10 years.

Adjustable-Rate Mortgages offer an initial rate that is fixed for the first seven years of repayment, then the rate adjusts every year thereafter for the remaining life of the loan.

Adjustable-Rate Mortgages mean the initial rate remains fixed for the first five years of repayment, and then adjusts every year thereafter. Remember that your rate and monthly payments may go up after only five years, so this choice is best if you're expecting to sell or refinance the property within that period.

Adjustable-Rate Mortgages provide three years at the initial fixed-rate, then the rate adjusts every year for the remaining life of the loan. A good choice if you expect to move or refinance in a relatively short period of time. But a much shorter fixed-rate period means your interest rate (and therefore monthly payments) may begin to fluctuate after three years.

Financing Your Next Home


 

Determine What You Can Afford

Each buyer is unique - and we'll help you find out just what you can afford. You already know that monthly income and financial obligations are most important in determining your price range. It's simple to make an estimate: just run the numbers for yourself using our Affordability Calculator.

Buying a Second Home

You'll need to identify sources for your down payment, since you're not selling your current house and using the proceeds, and you'll need to expect a larger monthly obligation for housing expenses. Work with your lender to create a customized loan program with the best combination of rate, points, and closing costs for your needs.

Less-than-perfect credit report?

Don't worry, there are options that are ideal for those who have a few "dings" on their credit report. Work with your lender to develop an individual mortgage program based on your unique credit worthiness.

New Home Appraisals

Some situations may qualify for a more streamlined loan process. Your credit history will help determine if your loan application can be completed without an appraisal.

Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI)

Loan programs for down payments of 20% or less require you to purchase Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI).

Selling Your Current Home

You may qualify for a new loan without even selling your current home. It's simple to run the numbers for yourself on our Affordability Calculator. You may also want to discuss a bridge loan with your mortgage company.

New Construction

If you are working with a builder within a sub-division or development and just making carpeting, lighting and appliance selections for a brand-new home, you can probably obtain a standard mortgage loan. But if you're hiring contractors, electricians, plumbers, and painters, you probably need a construction loan, which provides funds to pay subcontractors as work progresses. For more information on construction loans, contact your real estate professional, your mortgage company

When to Refinance


 

When to Refinance

Each homeowner is unique - and we'll help you determine if it's the right time for you to refinance. Effective refinancing typically means lowering your current mortgage loan rate by at least one percent. You might also want to consider changing the length of your loan or receiving cash from the equity in your house. It's simple to see what will work for you, just run the numbers for yourself using our Refinance Calculator.

Benefits of Refinancing

If you want to increase cash flow, refinancing to lower your monthly payment could help. To get a good idea of what your new monthly payment would be, use our Refinance Calculator. Refinancing could also allow you to shorten your loan term if you qualify.

Using Home Equity

Many people borrow against the equity in their homes and use the cash to make improvements. Up to 90 percent of the appraised value of your home can be used to make home improvements. The equity you can use is based on the value of the home and what you currently owe, subject to applicable state laws. You can still refinance if you don't have much equity -- up to 90 percent loan-to-value (LTV) if you want to refinance your house for a new rate and term. A reappraisal of your property may be required.

Refinancing Costs

You will have closing costs associated with refinancing your loan, including points and processing fees. You may have the option of rolling these costs into the loan amount to reduce your cash out of pocket. To evaluate your options, use our Refinance Calculator.

Fixed-Rate Mortgages

A fixed-rate mortgage means the interest rate and principal payments remain the same for the entire life of the loan. (Taxes, of course, may change.)

Advantages include consistent principal and interest payments make this loan stable your rate won't change, so you don't need to worry about market fluctuations. A good choice if you're likely to stay in this house for a long time.

Disadvantages include a possibly higher cost - these loans are usually priced higher than an adjustable-rate mortgage. Keep in mind that, on average, most people move or refinance within seven years. If rates in the current market are high, you're likely to get a better price with an adjustable-rate loan.

30 Year Fixed-Rate Mortgages offer consistent monthly payments for the entire 30 years you have the mortgage. So if the market is good, you can benefit from locking in a lower rate for the full term of the loan. The best choice if you're looking for a long-term, stable loan - for instance, if you're planning on staying in your house for some time.

20 Year Fixed-Rate Mortgages allow you to make a consistent monthly payment throughout the 20 years you have the mortgage. The shorter term means you pay the loan off more quickly, and therefore pay less interest. And you'll build equity faster than you would with a 30 year loan. (But remember the shorter term means higher payments, when compared to the 30 year fixed-rate mortgage.)

15 Year Fixed-Rate Mortgages mean consistent monthly payments for all 15 years you have the mortgage. By building equity even more quickly than with a 30 year or 20 year loan, and paying less interest, you'll save money in the long run. It's an ideal option if you can handle the higher payments and if you'd like to have the loan paid off in a shorter period of time - for instance, if you plan to retire.

Adjustable-Rate Mortgages

An adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM) means that the interest rate changes over the life of the loan - according to the terms specified in advance. With ARMs:

The initial interest rate is usually lower than with a fixed-rate mortgage.

The monthly repayment would also be lower.

The interest rate may be adjusted (up or down) at predetermined times.

The monthly payment will then increase or decrease.

Most ARM programs do offer "rate cap" protection, which limits the amount the rate can be increased, both each year and over the life of the loan. All ARMs are amortized over 30 years.

Advantages include lower costs - ARMs are usually priced lower than fixed-rate mortgages so you can increase your buying power and lower your initial monthly payments. If interest rates go down, you'll enjoy lower payments. Usually an ARM is the best choice for homeowners who plan to relocate (for example, with their company or the military), or for those who are purchasing their first home and plan to be in the property only for three to five years. Remember that, on average, most people move or refinance within seven years.

Disadvantages include the possibility of increasing monthly payments if interest rates go up. Keep in mind that ARMs are best for homeowners who aren't planning on staying with a property for a long period. If you're on a fixed income, an ARM (especially a short-term ARM) may not be your best choice.

Adjustable-Rate Mortgages provide a fixed initial rate of the loan for the first ten years of repayment. After 10 years, the rate adjusts every year thereafter for the remaining life of the loan. The loan is amortized over 30 years, so you'll enjoy the stability of a 30 year mortgage at a lower price than a fixed-rate mortgage of the same term. But an ARM is likely not the best choice if you're planning on owning the same property for more than 10 years.

Adjustable-Rate Mortgages offer an initial rate that is fixed for the first seven years of repayment, then the rate adjusts every year thereafter for the remaining life of the loan.

Adjustable-Rate Mortgages mean the initial rate remains fixed for the first five years of repayment, and then adjusts every year thereafter. Remember that your rate and monthly payments may go up after only five years, so this choice is best if you're expecting to sell or refinance the property within that period.

Adjustable-Rate Mortgages provide three years at the initial fixed-rate, then the rate adjusts every year for the remaining life of the loan. A good choice if you expect to move or refinance in a relatively short period of time. But a much shorter fixed-rate period means your interest rate (and therefore monthly payments) may begin to fluctuate after three years.

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